People

I supervised Lotte Schoot's PhD project while at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in the Netherlands (2013-2016). In her PhD-project, Lotte created naturalistic language experiments with a speaker as well as a listener in the same experiment. Lotte's overall aim was to study the effect of being in a social, communicative situation on processing language for speakers and listeners. Theories have proposed that speakers do not randomly pick out syntactic structures, but that they adapt their choice towards what they think the listener expects, i.e. syntactic alignment. In this paper, Lotte answered the question whether syntactic alignment influences how speakers are perceived by their conversation partner. In a different study, Lotte found that the neural correlates of core linguistic processes (e.g. syntactic processing) were not influenced by being in a communicative context (more information). In a recent review paper, Lotte argues for a two-brain approach to studying verbal interaction (more information). Lotte is currently working as a postdoc at Tufts University with Prof. Gina Kuperberg.

 

 

Kristian Suen is a PhD candidate in the School of Psychology at the University of Birmingham. His project focuses on the acquisition of Chinese characters across the lifespan. How do learners of Chinese as a second language acquire characters? Unlike alphabetic languages, the learning of Chinese Characters requires the integration of the form (orthography) the meaning (semantics) and the pronunciation (phonology) of the character as a whole. Kirstian's research aims to investigate the early stages of Chinese character learning characters using behavioural and brain imaging methods.

Sophie Hardy

Charlotte Poulisse

Sophie Hardy is a PhD candidate in the School of Psychology at the University of Birmingham. Her research focuses on changes in language production with age. She is specifically interested in the effect of age on syntactic choices and sentence planning. Prior to beginning her PhD, Sophie completed her MSc at the University of Warwick investigating syntactic priming across the lifespan.

 

 

Charlotte Poulisse is a PhD candidate in the School of Psychology at the University of Birmingham. Her project focuses on compensatory neural mechanisms for preserved language functioning in the ageing brain, and the breakdown of these processes in patients suffering from dementia.

Kristian Suen

Anna Belavina

Anna Belavina is a PhD candidate I am co-supervising with Prof. Mailce Mota at UFSC in Brazil. Anna’s project is focused on syntactic processing in children and young adults with dyslexia. Anna is doing behavioral and fMRI research.

Alumni

Lotte Schoot

I supervised Evelien Heyselaar's PhD project while at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in the Netherlands (2013-2016). During her PhD, Evelien investigated how syntactic processing is modulated by attention and by social characteristics, using Virtual Reality, EEG and behavioral experiments. She also researched the memory system underlying syntactic processing in a study on patients with Korsakov's syndrome (paper). In 2016, Evelien worked as a post-doc in my lab at the University of Birmingham, on a project investigating how implicit memory, sentence- and word-level language processing change throughout the lifespan. For publications, see here and here. More soon to appear!

 

 

Evelien Heyselaar

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